June 2, 2006

Your Dogs Nutrition 101



Dogs have specific nutritional needs, but most pet owners do not realize that all dogs and most pet foods are not alike. Many commercial dog food brands are lacking in key nutrients, so reading the labels is a must. Price and brand names are not good gages of quality when it comes to food.

Dogs are carnivorous so they need meat and protein, along with carbohydrates, vitamins, fat, minerals, and water. The manufacturers have choices as to the types and amounts of proteins, minerals, and vitamins that they put into their products. Higher levels of animal protein like chicken, lamb, and beef are needed by active dogs, while proteins found in plants or grains such as corn, soy, wheat, and rice are sufficient for less active dogs.

Puppy foods generally contain more protein than adult or maintenance foods. What you are looking for is a food that has two animal proteins in the first three ingredients listing. This is a good rule of thumb that applies to all dogs and breeds, not just puppies.

Carbohydrates are important buy only in small amounts. You should avoid foods that contain soy, because altogether soy is high in protein, it is also a carbohydrate that slows down digestion and prevents other vitamins and minerals in the food from being absorbed.

Vitamins come in two types, water soluble, and fat soluble. Vitamins B and C are water soluble, while vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat soluble. The B and C vitamins are lost through urination and need to be included in every meal, while vitamins A, D, E and K are stored up in the fatty tissues of the body and liver.

The type of dog food is important, because of digestion time. Raw foods, such as meat, vegetables, and even fruit are the easiest foods to digest, and usually in about 4 hours. Semi moist processed dog foods take longer, usually around 9 hours to pass through the stomach, and dry dog foods take up to 16 hours before the dog is receiving energy from the food.

For more information, please consult your veterinarian, as they are the best judge of your dogs individual needs. But it is up to us, the pet owners to care for our four legged friends by continuing to read those labels!

About The Author

Brent Jones and his partner Randy Jones have been in the pet industry for a long time. Recently they formed the website http://joncopets.com/ on the site, customers can read articles about anything pets as well as shop for the latest trendy items for their best friend. Feel free to check out the site at http://joncopets.com/ .

Brent Jones

June 2, 2006

Your Dogs Health – Your Guide to Accidental Poisoning



There are numerous poisonous substances that can be fatal to dogs and cats, but accidental poisoning can be avoided in most cases if we remember to keep as many of these substances out of reach of our pets. If you suspect that your dog or cat has been poisoned take a moment to try and retrace their movements to detect what type of poison they were exposed to, and then get the animal to the veterinarian at once. No matter what remedies may be suggested here or from other sources, always take the affected animal to a veterinarian as soon as possible, as this may be the only way to save your pets life.

Food poisoning is probably the most common because dogs are not discriminating in the selection of substances they eat if they find the smell attractive, and if their owners want to give them a treat in the form of table scraps, leftovers, candy, and drinks, (this is especially true around the holidays). Vomiting and diarrhea are common complaints in the vets office around Thanksgiving and Christmas. The rich food, spoiled leftovers, non digestible bones, candy, and drinks cant be tolerated by most pets. Spoiled food contains bacterial toxins produced by salmonella and pets suffering from bacterial toxemia must have veterinary treatment in the form of intravenous fluids and antibiotics just to survive.

Chocolate contains Theo bromine and caffeine which are both toxic to dogs and cats. Baking chocolate contains more of these chemicals than milk chocolate does, but both forms can be potentially lethal. A small dog can receive a lethal amount in only two or three squares of baking chocolate. Tea and coffee contain the same chemicals, and can also be lethal depending on the amount ingested. Warning signs include excitement, nervousness, muscle spasms, seizures, and increased body temperature. Veterinary treatment is recommended as soon as possible.

Poisonous plants in the home such as amaryllis, asparagus ferns, crown of thorns, ivy plants, and chrysanthemum plants are toxic to dogs and cats. Signs of plant poisoning are vomiting, abdominal pain, tremors, convulsions, and increases respiratory rate. Outdoor plants such as castor beans, daffodils, bittersweet, Indian tobacco, azalea, cherry laurel, hemlock, oleander, and yew are also toxic to pets and will produce the same effects. Only veterinary treatment will be effective.

Chemical poisons can include dish water granules, oven cleaners, furniture polish, toilet bowl cleaner, shoe polishes, floor polishes, bleach, ammonia, detergents, drain openers, kerosene, paint stripper, and paint removers, paint thinners, gasoline, wood preservatives, antifreeze and most other petroleum based products. Most cleaning products will destroy bodily tissues by acid or alkaline burns in the mouth and throat, accompanied by damage to the stomach, intestines and other internal organs. Antifreeze has a sweet taste that dogs and cats will lick. A dog that consumes only a half teaspoonful of antifreeze per pound of its body weight will have severe damage to its nervous system and kidneys. Signs of poisoning by chemicals are loss of coordination, vomiting, collapsing, convulsions, and coma. Veterinary treatment must be started immediately, and do not induce vomiting.

Pesticide poisoning occurs daily due to the extensive use of pesticides used around our homes and businesss. Ant poisons contain organophosphates or carbonates, both are toxic and can cause muscle tremors, nervousness, and convulsions. Snail baits and pellets contain the toxic metaldehyde causing tremors, rapid breathing, convulsions, coma, and death. Emergency veterinary treatment is required for both ant and snail poisons.

Rat and mouse poisons are typically the most lethal of all commercially used pesticides. Toxic chemicals in these poisons include warfain, sodium fluorecetate, strychnine, ANTU, bromethalin, cholecalciferol, phosphorus, red squill, zinc phosphide, and aluminum phosphide. By design, these poisons work in one of three ways, as anticoagulants, causing death by internal and external bleeding, signs include nasal bleeding, vomiting blood, blood in urine, weakness, poor coordination, abdominal pain and rapid breathing.

Poisons that do not contain anticoagulants effect the nervous system, causing hyper excitability, muscle tremors, seizures, and kidney and heart failure. The last group is the phosphorus containing poisons that damage the liver. Early signs are vomiting, bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain and a yellow color to the skip and mouth. Phosphorus poisoning is usually fatal due to the irreversible internal damage done to the animal.

To summarize, learn to recognize the symptoms of poisoning, acute abdominal pain, crying and whimpering, vomiting and retching, panting, curling up in a dark corner, blood in urine, vomiting blood, bloody diarrhea, tremors, excitability, and poor coordination. Take your pet to the Veterinarian immediately as most poisons can be fatal, and little can be done by the owner to neutralize or remove the poisons once the ingestion occurs.

About The Author

Brent Jones and his partner Randy Jones have been in the pet industry for a long time. Recently they formed the website http://joncopets.com/ on the site, customers can read articles about anything pets as well as shop for the latest trendy items for their best friend. Feel free to check out the site at http://joncopets.com/ .

Brent Jones

June 2, 2006

Your Dogs Health – The Basics Every Pet Owner Should know



Your dog is probably stronger and healthier than most humans that you know. However, by taking him from his natural environment, where only the strongest survive, to the artificial one in which most pet dogs live, we have exposed him to an entirely new set of dangers which their instincts are not designed to cope with.

A dogs health is influenced by the genes inherited from his parents and by the care given to his mother during the prenatal period, as well as to the puppy during his first 2 or 3 months of life. A puppy, whose mother was properly cared for during pregnancy, will be more able to handle the hazards of growing up.

The majority of dogs lead perfectly healthy, normal lives. They overcome occasional skin rashes, chills, and upset stomachs, recover from cuts and bruises with ordinary care, sensible first aid when necessary, and professional diagnosis and treatment of serious ailments. Chances are that if you give you dog a normal diet, a healthy home environment, a well balanced life, you will only need to see the vet for check-ups and vaccinations.

A healthy dogs temperature, taken rectally when he is rested, is about 101.2 degrees in an adult dog, 102 in small breeds, and 102.5 in a puppy. It can fluctuate one way or the other, being lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon. Long-coated breeds have a slightly higher normal temperature than short-coated ones. His pulse is taken at the femoral artery, high inside the thigh. There is no normal pulse rate for dogs. It can range from 120 beats per minute in a young puppy, to 70 or 80 in an older dog. Count the beats during 30 seconds and multiply by 2. Normal respiration ranges from 20 or 30 respirations per minute for a puppy to 16 per minute in an older dog.

A normal eye is bright and clear, although the lens becomes pale blue as he ages. His nose is moist and cool most of the time, but a dry, warm nose doesnt always mean a fever or illness. His tail wags and he carries himself normally. His coat is shiny and sheds normally. He eats his meals without gulping compulsively and without being coaxed, drinks a normal amount of water after meals and exercise, and more during hot weather. His bowel movements are regular and well-formed, his urine is clear and both processs are painless. As a puppy he sleeps most of the time, but as an adult only about half the time, and he is generally friendly, alert, and inquisitive.

A sick or ailing dog will have a temperature over 102 degrees, a sign of fever, or under a 100, a sign of weakness. If it does not return to normal within 24 hours, call the vet. If his temperature is as low as 99, or as high as 104, call the vet immediately. His pulse may be weak or irregular, his respiration at rest may be irregular or labored, panting or weak. His eye may appear dull, red or yellow with a sticky discharge. His nose may be dry and hot, also with a discharge.

His tail may be immobile, carried stiffly or between the legs, his coat may be dry and stand up when it should lay flat, the skin may be itchy and flaky and there may be bald spots, or red patches. He may eat with a good appetite but usually doesnt want food at all, and is usually reluctant to swallow any water. His bowel movements may be abnormal in form or color, have a bad odor, and contain blood or mucus, or he may be constipated with no movement at all. The urine may be dark, cloudy, or painfully produced.

He may sleep all of the time and hide in dark corners; his breath may have a bad odor and be labored. He may show very obvious symptoms of disorder such as swellings, protuberances, lameness, pain, prolonged wheezing or coughing, and unusual sensitivity in some part of his body. His overall general behavior will be lethargic and unresponsive when he is normally friendly and active, or nervous and excitable when he is the quite type with snapping or snarling for no apparent reason.

The symptoms offered here which are fairly obvious and not too far from our own human symptoms, (good and bad). Its the severity of the symptoms for an ailing dog that will determine whether you should call the vet. Far sighted dog and cat owners select a veterinarian as soon as they become a pet parent, for sooner or later they get sick to some degree, and your chances of prompt attention are better if the vet already knows your pet.

About The Author

Randy Jones and his partner Brent Jones have been in the pet industry for a long time. Recently they formed Joncopets.com . On the site, customers can read articles about anything pets as well as shop for the latest fancy dog collars, dog dresses, fancy dog beds, and more for their best friend. Feel free to check out the site at http://www.joncopets.com .

Randy Jones

June 2, 2006

Your Dogs Health – The Basics Every Dog Owner Should Know



This article describes things about a dogs health that every dog owner should know. After reading this article, dog owners should know more about diagnosing their pet.

Your dog is probably stronger and healthier than most humans that you know.  However, by taking him from his natural environment, where only the strongest survive, to the artificial one in which most pet dogs live, we have exposed him to an entirely new set of dangers which their instincts are not designed to cope with.

A dogs health is influenced by the genes inherited from his parents and by the care given to his mother during the prenatal period, as well as to the puppy during his first 2 or 3 months of life.  A puppy, whose mother was properly cared for during pregnancy, will be more able to handle the hazards of growing up.

The majority of dogs lead perfectly healthy, normal lives.  They overcome occasional skin rashes, chills, and upset stomachs, recover from cuts and bruises with ordinary care, sensible first aid when necessary, and professional diagnosis and treatment of serious ailments.  Chances are that if you give you dog a normal diet, a healthy home environment, a well balanced life, you will only need to see the vet for check-ups and vaccinations.

A healthy dogs temperature, taken rectally when he is rested, is about 101.2 degrees in an adult dog, 102 in small breeds, and 102.5 in a puppy.  It can fluctuate one way or the other, being lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon.  Long-coated breeds have a slightly higher normal temperature than short-coated ones.  His pulse is taken at the femoral artery, high inside the thigh.  There is no normal pulse rate for dogs.  It can range from 120 beats per minute in a young puppy, to 70 or 80 in an older dog.  Count the beats during 30 seconds and multiply by 2.  Normal respiration ranges from 20 or 30 respirations per minute for a puppy to 16 per minute in an older dog.

A normal eye is bright and clear, although the lens becomes pale blue as he ages.  His nose is moist and cool most of the time, but a dry, warm nose doesnt always mean a fever or illness.  His tail wags and he carries himself normally.  His coat is shiny and sheds normally.  He eats his meals without gulping compulsively and without being coaxed, drinks a normal amount of water after meals and exercise, and more during hot weather.  His bowel movements are regular and well-formed, his urine is clear and both processs are painless.  As a puppy he sleeps most of the time, but as an adult only about half the time, and he is generally friendly, alert, and inquisitive.

A sick or ailing dog will have a temperature over 102 degrees, a sign of fever, or under a 100, a sign of weakness.  If it does not return to normal within 24 hours, call the vet.  If his temperature is as low as 99, or as high as 104, call the vet immediately.  His pulse may be weak or irregular, his respiration at rest may be irregular or labored, panting or weak.  His eye may appear dull, red or yellow with a sticky discharge.  His nose may be dry and hot, also with a discharge.

His tail may be immobile, carried stiffly or between the legs, his coat may be dry and stand up when it should lay flat, the skin may be itchy and flaky and there may be bald spots, or red patches.  He may eat with a good appetite but usually doesnt want food at all, and is usually reluctant to swallow any water.  His bowel movements may be abnormal in form or color, have a bad odor, and contain blood or mucus, or he may be constipated with no movement at all.  The urine may be dark, cloudy, or painfully produced.

He may sleep all of the time and hide in dark corners; his breath may have a bad odor and be labored.  He may show very obvious symptoms of disorder such as swellings, protuberances, lameness, pain, prolonged wheezing or coughing, and unusual sensitivity in some part of his body.  His overall general behavior will be lethargic and unresponsive when he is normally friendly and active, or nervous and excitable when he is the quite type with snapping or snarling for no apparent reason.

The symptoms offered here which are fairly obvious and not too far from our own human symptoms, (good and bad).  Its the severity of the symptoms for an ailing dog that will determine whether you should call the vet.  Far sighted dog and cat owners select a veterinarian as soon as they become a pet parent, for sooner or later they get sick to some degree , and your chances of prompt attention are better if the vet already knows your pet.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Randy Jones and his partner Brent Jones have been in the pet industry for a long time. Recently they formed Joncopets.com. On the site, customers can read articles about anything pets as well as shop for the latest fancy dog collars, dog dresses, fancy dog beds, and more for their best friend. Feel free to check out the site at http://www.joncopets.com

Brent Jones

June 2, 2006

Your Dogs Emotions – Things Every Dog Owner Should Know



Your dog is more similar to you in their emotions than in their mentality. Some of their emotional reactions are so much like ours, that we tend to humanize them. The dogs emotions are visibly expressed in his eyes and face, his ear and tail movements, his posture, and general behavior. Sometimes they are vocally expressed as well. Your dog can feel and express the same emotions as we do: love, hate, joy, sorrow, grief, anxiety, jealousy, remorse, anger, fear, and even more subtle ones such as distrust and resignation.

Pet dogs have an endearing tendency to imitate their owners emotional reactions, which may not weigh much in an argument, but it certainly offers much in moral support. They are no more individual in expressing their emotions than we are. Dogs approach and seek contact with objects and beings that inspire friendly feelings, and avoid or shy away from those they fear. Often a dog will pretend not to see a person or animal he dislikes. A crouching position and a watchful eye mean that he has not yet made up his mind to trust or distrust.

Some facial expressions are much like ours. Worried frowns, angry glares, adoring gazes, suspicious squints, questioning looks, seductive glances, humor, and even genuine smiles. A smile, accompanied by half-closed eyes and ears held low signifies intense pleasure. Dogs express their feelings thru body language more so than facial expressions. A wagging tail and friendly grin are invitations to approach and perhaps make friends, while a snarl, a fixed stare, stiff, straight legs and tail are warnings to keep your distance. The question of distance is important to the dog because of territorial concerns and of survival instincts.

Dogs usually give voice to the emotions, and their meanings are generally clear. A happy dog gurgles or squeals with pleasure. A gentle whine says please, and snarling is definitely hostile. Dogs yelp from pain or fear, whine from frustration or pain, and sigh for the same reasons we do. Puppy cries are easiest to interpret, they scream when they are too hot, whimper when cold, and protest loudly when hungry. Barking is usually done to attract attention or to work excess energy if the dog is constrained such as in a kennel. Dogs exchange information among themselves less by voice than by a wide range of facial expressions, body postures and gestures.

An owner who takes the trouble to observe his dog and pay him the courtesy of listening to him, can establish a simple two-way communications system with his pet. Canine messages are usually very elementary, as he asks much less of us than we do of him. Im hungry, Im thirsty, I need to go out, or Come with me, are among the messages he manages to convey very well, considering his limited means. His most eloquent utterance is perhaps the emotional gurgle or barks that mean to say, Its about time you came home, Ive missed you!

About The Author

Randy Jones and his partner Brent Jones have been in the pet industry for a long time. Recently they formed the website http://joncopets.com/ on the site, customers can read articles about anything pets as well as shop for the latest trendy items for their best friend. Feel free to check out the site at http://joncopets.com/ .

Randy Jones

June 1, 2006

Your Dog’s Health; Why Dog Breath is No Laughing Matter



Your dogs health is important to you. You show her how important by keeping her well fed and groomed, making sure she gets plenty of exercise and providing a collection of fun, safe toys for her entertainment. You don’t skimp on the quality of his food. And to reward good boys and girls, there are always lots of delicious treats in the cupboard.
But if he has bad breath, you could be overlooking a serious problem with your dogs health.

“Dog Breath” is such a common condition that we make jokes about it. Sometimes we even tease our human “friends” using “dog breath” in play-ground style name-calling ( although hopefully this is limited to teenage boys.) And I know many pet owners who comment that they love their dog or cat like a child, but just can’t stand the smell of the animal’s breath! Well, guess what? “Dog Breath” isn’t normal.

It’s estimated that 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats over the age of three suffer from the periodontal disease a serious deterioration of the gums and supporting bones of the teeth. Yes, it’s periodontal disease that’s responsible for “dog breath”. But the problem doesn’t confine itself to your furry baby’s mouth. It’s an infection, and the tiny creatures responsible for it can break loose and enter the bloodstream. Once they do, they can infect vital organs such as the liver and kidneys, endangering your dogs health by causing a far more serious illness.

The best way to insure your dogs health, especially where periodontal disease is concerned, is with prevention . It can make all the difference.

Periodontal disease begins as gingivitis , which is virtually harmless and completely treatable. If allowed to move to the next stage–Periodontitis– it can be stopped, but not cured. And the worse it gets, the faster it progresses. This applies to all animals, two legged and four legged alike. Think of a car parked at the top of a hill. The emergency break is released, and the car begins to roll downhill. Now, if you hit the breaks right away, no harm done. But the farther the car rolls the faster it goes, and the more momentum it builds. It gets harder and harder to stop it. By the time it’s halfway down the hill, you could be headed for disaster!

You can maintain your dogs health nicely with proper home care. But, like the rolling car, if disease is already present, stopping and controlling it is a bigger job.

Prevention involves, above all, regular veterinary checkups and professional cleanings beginning early in your dog or cat’s life. I’ll show you how you can help maintain oral health at home, but it’s impossible to do a thorough cleaning on an animal who’s awake. Trust me on this. It’s hard enough to do a thorough job with a cooperative human patient. When we’re talking about animals who don’t understand what we’re doing or why, forget about it.

Most veterinarians recommend annual cleanings, but more frequent or involved treatment may be needed depending on your animal’s condition. Please, no matter what you’re doing at home, follow the vet’s recommendations. As for your part, introduce your dog or cat to the idea of having his teeth brushed as early as possible. I know, it’s not easy, and it takes time and daily conditioning to get your little guy or gal used to it. But your dogs health is worth it!

So how do you prevent the most common of threats to your dogs health? Brush her teeth, of course! Every day. Just like you would your own (twice a day for you, and floss too!!). This isn’t easy, but it can become an expected part of your dog’s routine if you do it right. Here are some suggestions: 1. Start when your dog is a puppy. The earlier the better.

2. At first, you just want her to get used to you handling her head and looking inside her mouth. Practice lifting up her lips and looking at her teeth and gums–front, back and both sides of her mouth.

3. Now begin gently touching the gum tissue with your finger and rub along her gums and teeth as if your finger were a toothbrush. Let her get used to the sensation. This is exactly the way you would introduce a human baby to brushing, beginning with just her gums. Even before there are teeth, there are harmful bacteria. So don’t worry about a tiny puppy who doesn’t have a full set of teeth yet–rub her gums, swab out her little mouth with your finger, and get her used the this kind of contact from her owner.

4. Your next step is to wrap gauze or a soft washcloth around your finger and rub the gums on both the outer and inner surfaces of the teeth.

5. Finally, introduce a tooth brush in one small area. As your dog gets used to the brush, you will be able to use it in place of the gauze or washcloth. Remember to brush the inside surfaces! A little brushing a day, beginning with the first step and working your way up gradually, will eventually lead to a one to two minute session. Your dog will learn that it doesn’t hurt and that she gets a couple of minutes of your undivided attention every day. It generally takes 8 to 16 weeks to get there, but in the end your dog will accept brushing as part of her daily routine.

If a little brushing is done every day at a set time, eventually your pet gets used to it, and some will even look forward to it. It will take most pet owners from 8-16 weeks until the pet accepts it readily. Now the pet realizes it doesn’t hurt and that it will get 1-2 minutes of your undivided attention. Your pet enjoys your attention, and will eventually wait patiently for you to brush his teeth.

There’s a toothbrush with three heads that will allow you to brush all three surface of the tooth at one time, which makes life a lot easier for both of you! It also has nice, soft bristles so you won’t harm your pet’s delicate gum tissue.There are also products that can be rubbed on the gums and added to the drinking water to help reduce bacteria in an animal’s mouth and promote the dogs health and healing. Bad breath is actually a by-product of the bacteria that populate the mouth. They break down proteins and carbohydrates from your dog or cat’s diet, and produce something called “volatile sulfur compounds”, or VSC’s. It’s the sulfur that make the breath smell extra special!

Certain dental products have an agent that neutralizes the VSC’s. Many owners have commented that their cat or dog seems to like the drinking water better when these products are added–even though they have no flavor! And there’s a gel available that, although formulated for the gums, can be very soothing for skin conditions, cuts, and surgical wounds thanks to the Aloe Vera it contains.

The best oral care products work without the use of fragrances and flavors , which entice human consumers, but don’t benefit your cat or dogs health in any way!

I was a practicing dentist for over 20 years , and I saw a lot of human patients who had terrible breath (and periodontal disease) and weren’t even aware of it. People don’t like to tell each other about bad breath. Even the dentist has to be delicate with this piece of bad news.

At least when dealing with a pet, you don’t have to worry about social embarrassment in order to address your dogs health problem! Don’t be shy, get in there and do something about it. Not only can your dog get rid of her breath odor, but she could even live 2 to 5 years longer as a result. And you’ll be able to get close again, without holding your breath.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Carolyn Schweitzer DDS. Dr. Schweitzer was a family dentist for 20 years and is now owner and editor of several websites. You can learn more about specific dental care products by visiting her website at http://www.great-dog-gift.com/dentalcare

Carolyn Schweitzer

June 1, 2006

Your Dog’s Health May Be At Risk!



Dogs should be living to age 20 or more. That’s their natural lifespan. But it’s being cut short by chemical toxicity in your dog’s environment and in commercial petfood, which is fed (to a greater or lesser extent) to over 90 per cent of pets in modern society.

Whether you feed your dog fresh meat or home prepared food as your primary food source, if you’re giving ANY commercial petfood to your dog, the chances are that you’re cutting your dog’s life short. Add to this the toxicity of most veterinary-prescribed and over the counter drugs, including your dog’s vaccinations, cortisone (given for a multitude of problems), and parasite treatments (worms, fleas, ticks, mites and so on), and you’ve got a chemical cocktail which is causing premature ageing and death in companion animals all over the industrialized world.

Does it have to be this way?

Pollutants affect us all to some degree, but there ARE a number of steps that you can take to minimise your dog’s exposure to toxic compounds that affect your dog’s health and longevity. There ARE chemical-free dog food programs. There ARE natural alternatives to most toxic drugs routinely given to your dog. And you CAN reduce the pollutants and chemicals that your dog is exposed to on a daily basis.

(c) 2005, Brigitte Smith, Healthy Happy Dogs

About the author:
Brigitte Smith is a dog lover with a special interest in natural health for dogs. For your free dog health report, click here: http://www.HealthyHappyDogs.com

For info on detoxifying your dog’s system, click here: http://www.HealthyHappyDogs.com/RemoveToxinsNaturally



Brigitte Smith

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